India must use IPV to eradicate polio, says Dr Jacob John

In 1974, when the WHO started the expanded polio immunisation drive, polio was a menace globally. Hence the sudden cropping up of rare cases of OPV-induced polio, after anti-polio drives was considered the lesser of two evils.
Representative image
Representative image

VELLORE: “India should opt for the IPV (injected polio vaccine) if it was serious about eradicating it in the country,” noted virologist Dr T Jacob John. “Continued use of OPV (oral polio vaccine) has resulted in a vaccine-induced polio variant creating around 100 cases in the country annually.”

“Globally, around 500 vaccine induced polio cases annually are reported from low-income countries. But the figures of affected children are never revealed,” he adds. “The expenditure of 1 annual OPV campaign will be enough to ensure IPV to all children.”

IPV need not be given separately to children, as it’s now part of a hexavalent vaccine which includes protection against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, HIV and IPV. “Three injections children lifelong immunity against polio,” he points out.

In 1974, when the WHO started the expanded polio immunisation drive, polio was a menace globally. Hence the sudden cropping up of rare cases of OPV-induced polio, after anti-polio drives was considered the lesser of two evils.

“When the World Health Assembly targeted 2000 as the year to eradicate polio totally, there should have been a change as to how polio was administered. Medical professionals were aware of the vaccine-induced virus creating new cases. IPV, despite having no side effects, was sidelined as the OPV was cheaper and easy to administer,” he opines.

Visit news.dtnext.in to explore our interactive epaper!

Download the DT Next app for more exciting features!

Click here for iOS

Click here for Android

Related Stories

No stories found.
DT next
www.dtnext.in